I just wanted to tell you how much I like the Fimo Soft clays. The colors are positively beautiful! I also thank you for your fast delivery.

Shirley Hackensack, MN

More Testimonials »

Mark Tobey

Mark Tobey

(1890 - 1976)
Born: Centreville, Wisconsin
Style: Expressionism
Famous Works:
  • Broadway (1935)
  • Universal Field (1949)
  • White Journey (1956)
From the tradition of Abstract Expressionists like Jackson Pollock, Franz Kline, and Robert Ryman comes Mark Tobey's distinctive style of painting. He was trained briefly at the Art Institute of Chicago, and worked as a fashion illustrator, portrait draughtsman, and interior decorator. Tobey was exposed to the Baha'i Faith in 1918 and converted the same year. The Baha'i Faith served as Tobey's introduction to Eastern philosophy and piqued his interest in the relationship between art and spirituality. Tobey moved to Seattle in 1922, the city that would come to serve as his base of operations. While in Seattle, Tobey was introduced to Eastern calligraphy and took an enthusiastic interest in the discipline. Mark Tobey had an intense appetite for travel, moving and teaching throughout Europe and Asia, even spending part of the summer of 1934 in a Japanese Zen monastery. 1935 was a big year for Tobey, marking his first solo exhibition, and his development of the painting method for which he would become famous. "White writing", as it is now known, was Tobey's unique style of incorporating intricate webs of white lines. In these works Tobey eschewed form, allowing his brush to move freely and creating some of the first examples of the all-over painting style that Jackson Pollock would make famous. The dynamic surfaces teem in a complex rhythm of gestural marks of white and colored pigments. Despite its apparent connection to Abstract Expressionism, Tobey was not interested in the tenets of "action" painting, and discouraged any connection to Jackson Pollock. He felt that a painting should be a manifestation of meditation, not action. Tobey's spirituality drove his work for his entire career. His reputation soared in the 1950s when his work was feted in Europe, more so than in America. He was awarded the painting prize at the Venice Biennale in 1958, and in 1961 was given first prize in painting at the Carnegie International. Mark Tobey died in Basel, Switzerland on April 24, 1976.
Feeling inspired? Try out these fine products…

From $1.92

Staplebound Notebooks

by Rhodia

Take your inspiration anywhere

Up to 58% Off

Up to 70% Off

Gallerywrap Stretched Canvas

by Fredrix

Gallery style frames, stapled on the back

Up to 45% Off

Up to 34% Off

Studio XL Oil Paint

by Pebeo

Colours are intense and permanent.

From $24.75

The New Artist's Manual

by Chronicle Books

Illustrated with more than 1,300 color photographs and artworks
Deal of the Week
(valid thru Aug 4)
 

Archival Watercolor Stretched Canvas

by Fredrix

16 in. x 20 in., each

100% cotton artist canvas

  Archival Watercolor Stretched Canvas

 
List: $22.15
 
Non-Member: $11.08
50% OFF
 
VIP Member: $6.65
70% OFF

Latest Product Reviews

This is not only the best eraser I've ever used, it's the ONLY eraser I'll ever use, despite the best sales pitches in art shops to get me to change. Cleans superbly, soft to use, no discoloration on the paper and cheap as chips...I don't believe it has a competitor
- Steve Reddin in Dublin, Ireland
I used Porcelaine 150 about 14 years ago on some glasses; they have been washed over and over in the dishwasher, and the color is still bright and beautiful. I did bake them in the oven as the directions specified. This is a great product!
- Linda in Dripping Springs, Tx
I never saw it mentioned on the web, but it has a terrible smell like sharpie marker. It dries super fast in the package, even keeping it in a ziplock baggie. Other than that .it was ok but Plus clay is much better in my opinion, and similar in all the good ways.
- Ingrid G in CA, USA

Free Download for Kids

Download free coloring book pages Download FREE
coloring book
pages to color at
home or school.

View Pages »

Please wait...
Please wait...