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Styles & Periods
Prehistoric Art

Humans have been making art for at least 40,000 years, perhaps even longer. Prehistoric Art spans a vast period of time, and has been discovered in some form throughout much of the world. By definition, Prehistoric Art is art that was created before a reliable historical record exists for the culture responsible. Most often this refers to written record. Evidence suggests that in the Middle Paleolithic era (200,000 to 50,000 years ago), early humans were developing crafting skills for purely functional purposes. This craftsmanship can be observed in stone tools, such as bifaces, tools that are deliberately shaped by flaking both sides. In these tools, an awareness of symmetry can be inferred, hinting that our ancestors had developed some sense, albeit primitive, of the aesthetic. If tools from the Middle Paleolithic serve to hint at man's emerging artistic ability, then discoveries from the Upper Paleolithic (40,000 to 10,000 years ago) are a ringing testimony. Art from this period includes figurines, cave paintings, and carvings. Among these works are small feminine figures carved in stone. Rather than aiming for realism in proportion, these figures’ exaggerated anatomy suggests symbols of fertility; the pieces have been termed “Venuses” after the Greco-Roman goddess of love. Large animals were the primary artistic concern of the Upper Paleolithic cave painters. Animals were rendered in profile; deer, bison and horses race across the ceilings in the cave paintings of Lascaux and Altamira. By the end of the Upper Paleolithic, the human impetus to create art had incredible momentum, and the fusion of form and function are evident. Decorated pottery vessels have been discovered in Brazil and Venezuela, coinciding with finds from the Korean Jeulmun Pottery Period. From the megaliths and metalwork of Europe, to the stylized rock art of Saharan Africa, and the elaborate textiles, gold work, and masonry of South America, Prehistoric Art provides significant insight into the development of human creativity.


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Latest Product Reviews

This is an excellent watercolor set to start to work with. I've used this mainly for portrait and nude paintings. Sometimes I'd mix it with a white paste to create my own custom gouache. The beauty of the set is that they are in tubes, so mixing and making your own mixes is very, very easy to do.i have been using this set up for almost 5 years now, and I always come back to this set for my creativity.
- Dave N in Boyds, MD
I bought one of these clothes because of the way it looked, but WOW how it works! I use it to clean my glasses, and no other product comes close to the Hi-Look. I am buying them to give as gifts.
- Andrea T. in St. Paul, MN
I apply these paints in small plastic bottles and add a metal tip to outline and apply. The only thing I dislike is you never know which color will change to a different color after baking. Mostly I use the Pebeo 150. I find they do not change color after baking. Another problem is they do not have it in white,first time I used what looked like white, it turned ivory and even looked more yellow than ivory. I just wish there were more art suppliers who carry it. Most of the time I order it.
- Shirley Dentler in Houston

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