I thought the service was outstanding. I received the shipment quickly and it was packaged nicely. I appreciated the confirmation too. I like to print them and keep them so I can keep track of what I order.

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Styles & Periods
Bauhaus

The Bauhaus School was founded in 1919 by Walter Gropius at Weimar, Germany, and later relocated to Dessau, Berlin, and, eventually, Chicago. The Bauhaus has had an incalculable effect on modern architecture and design, yielding hallmarks of the modern style in everything from skyscrapers to the "applied design" of teapots and toasters. The main aim of the Bauhaus was to join form and function, uniting principles of creative design with the tenets and technologies of modern science and industry. As chairman of the Working Council for Art, Gropius sought to bring all art together "under one roof,” creating architecture designed with the worker in mind. The Bauhaus was a response to the demand for buildings of specialized function; in the school, art and engineering came together. Its aim was political as well; founded in the capital of a tense, tumultuous post-WWI Germany, the Bauhaus was a self-conscious rejection of all things bourgeois. Like the Futurists, those at the Bauhaus were intensely interested in using "new" materials like glass and steel. The Bauhaus was a collectivist vision, focused on purity and utility; it shunned "bourgeois" elements like cornices, eaves, color and a surplus of space. Roofs were flat and facades sheer; rationality, not comfort, ruled the day. When the Nazis rose to power in 1937, the Bauhaus moved to Chicago (where it later morphed into the Chicago Institute of Design), and Mies van der Rohe, a successor of Gropius, also moved to Chicago. As a result, the principles of the Bauhaus quickly pollinated the world, and its influence continues to be felt in typography and industrial design as well as architecture.


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Latest Product Reviews

I have used these exact brushes exclusively for over 30 years teaching art to students from kindergarten to college. They hold up extremely well, if washed properly. They also hold a point and can handle a lot of paint at once. If taken care of they can last for years of continuous use. Students appreciate their quality and get much better results with a higher grade of brush, I cannot believe that Loew-Cornell has discontinued making them; so get them while you can find them.
- Mary Ann in Fleming Island, Fl
OMG The best. I used red and I only had to put one coat. I was shocked. I will be buying all the colors.
- Karen J in North Augusta SC
I'm not a stencil artist but a silversmith. I have several of the 1" brushes, and they are perfect for sweeping my bench. I use the brushes to sweep the silver and gold filings off my bench, and they do a superb job of cleaning loose metal bits off my projects. I don't like to use any other brushes. I use the smaller ones ( the 1/2" and 3/8") for gently cleaning wax models and jewelry in progress. These brushes have greater control, stiffness and yet pliable bristles that does the job very well. I'm sticking with these brushes for a very long time.
- Joy in Concord, NH

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